Vintage Costume Christmas and Carnival Jewelry from Barbara Satalino Collection

Exhibition date: 
12. December 2008 - 19:00 - 31. December 2008 - 19:00
Opening at 12th of December at 7:00 P.M. at 2 Światy Art Gallery. Presentation of american Christmas and Carnival costume jewelry and dresses from a unique collection of Barbara Satalino. Exhibition will last till 31st of December. Christmas Pins, by Barbara Satalino. As a dealer and collector of vintage fashion jewelry I have come to appreciate these holiday treasures. Over the years I have collected a large variety of trees, bells, wreaths, santas, angels and stickings. Occasionally a new design will surface which ads to my delight and appreciation of the designers expression and imagination. There is no limit to their talents. To a collector it is always a challenge to discover that that one special “missing” piece. I have met collectors whose passionate efforts have resulted in a prolific collection of hundreds of Christmas pins of all varieties and designs. There are many books on costume jewelry that mentiion the Christmas pins as an important collectible. The Christmas Tree is the most produced pin and the most collected. There are many varieties with clear and multicolored stones enamels and tinkling ornaments made in assorted sizes and shapes. Christmas pins were first introduced in the 40’s and they became popular in the 50’s. Eisenberg, Weiss, Hobe, Art, Coro, Benedickt and Hollycraft were the few designers whose unique creations became todays collectibles. Many of these companies are no longer in production and therefore are scarce and will command a higher price. Many pins were sold unstamped with just a tag or label which usually was discarded making it impossible to identify the designer. Dating pins can be challenge and there are some reliable ways of determining the approximate age of the pin. Examining the pin for a particular look and style, pin back type, clasp, ect. Also, there are many reliable books that can guide a collector to the approximate date and value of a particular pin. The condition and age of the pin, it’s uniqueness and design are very important factors and add to the value of the pin. Pins that are broken, chipped or damaged should be rejected, although missing stones can usually be replaced. Hollycraft was one of the manufacturers who dated and signed their jewelry. Eisenberg, Gerry’s and J.J. are a few of the manufacturers who are still in production today. Eisenberg is highly respected and desirable designer for todays collectors. Eisenberg’s first Christmas pins wre sold unstamped with just label making it difficult to validate their authenticity. Earlier Eisenber Christmas pins were signed witha a stamped “E” followed with “Eisenberg” and their current signature “Eisenber Ice”. Eisenberg has maintained it’s succesful operation sice 1914. The company is currently headed by Karl Eisenberg, grandson of the original owner Jonas Eisenberg. Proper care and storage is also important as this will protect the pins from damage. They can be kept in separated boxes or in plastic bags, or praced ina lined box. Christmas pins can be displayed in shadow boxex with interesting arrangements or they can be pinned on pillows or cushions in a prominent area for display. How about decorating a small table top tree with these little holliday treasures, the ultimate christmas tree decoration. Christmas pins can be worn on the lapel of a jacket or coat, pinned in clusters to make a statement. An evening bag or a hat decorated with a lovely ornament will always bring an expression of admiration. All one needs is a little imagination for that individual fashion statement. A holiday package decorated with Christmas a pin is another way of bringing Christmas cheer, and will start the receiver on their own adventures of Christmas pin collecting.

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